John Calvin

John Calvin (1509-1564) is widely considered the most important figure in the second generation of the Protestant Reformation. Having first encountered the ideas of Martin Luther while studying in Paris, he pursued the Reformed faith himself following a conversion experience in 1533. Eventually settling in Geneva, Calvin established a Protestant city government, while his landmark text, the Institutes of the Christian Religion, helped codify Protestant theology for Churches across Europe.

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