JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser.

You must have JavaScript enabled in your browser to utilize the functionality of this website. Click here for instructions on enabling javascript in your browser.

Cookie Consent
This site uses session cookies to personalise your browsing experience and to provide a secure shopping environment. We also use Google Analytics tracking cookies to provide data for the analysis of site traffic. Please click on the Accept button to accept cookies from this site.

For full details of the cookies that we use and your options for managing or refusing cookies, please visit our Cookie Policy page.

Sacramental Presence after Heidegger:

Onto-theology, Sacraments and the Mother's Smile

By Conor Sweeney

Sacramental Presence after Heidegger

Sacramental Presence after Heidegger:

Onto-theology, Sacraments and the Mother's Smile

By Conor Sweeney

An examination of how Heidegger's postmodern legacy has affected sacramental theology, emphasising the ongoing role of metaphysics in the Christian narrative.

Trade Information: JPOD
Available as: Paperback, PDF

  • Share:
  • Share this title on Twitter
  • Share this title on Facebook
  • Share this title on Google+

Print Paperback

ISBN: 9780227175354

Specifications: 229x153mm (9x6in), 282pp

Published: August 2015

£23.00

PDF eBook

ISBN: 9780227904824

Specifications: 263pp

Published: August 2015

£19.50 + VAT
Available from other vendors

Theology after Heidegger must take into account history and language as elements in the pursuit of meaning. Quite often, this prompts a hurried flight from metaphysics to an embrace of an absence at the centre of Christian narrativity. Conor Sweeney here explores the "postmodern" critique of presence in the context of sacramental theology, engaging the thought of Louis-Marie Chauvet and Lieven Boeve. Chauvet is an influential postmodern theologian whose critique of the perceived onto-theological constitution of presence in traditional sacramental theology has made big waves, while Boeve is part of a more recent generation of theologians who even more wholeheartedly embrace postmodern consequences for theology.

Sweeney considers the extent to which postmodernism à la Heidegger upsets the hermeneutics of sacramentality, asking whether this requires us to renounce the search for a presence that by definition transcends us. Against both the fetishisation of presence and absence, Sweeney argues that metaphysics has a properly sacramental basis, and that it is only through this reality that the dialectic of presence and absence can be transcended. The case is made for the full but restless signification of the mother's smile as the paradigm for genuine sacramental presence.

Preface
Acknowledgments

Introduction: Context, History, Object

1. Postmodern Soundings
2. Sacramental Presence in Louis-Marie Chauvet
3. Sacramental Presence in Lieven Boeve
4. The Praxis of Sacramental Presence after Heidegger
5. Reimagining Metaphysics after Onto-Theology

Conclusion: Sacramental Presence and the Mother's Smile

Bibliography
Subject Index
Author Index

Conor Sweeney is a lecturer at the John Paul II Institute for Marriage and Family in Melbourne.

Conor Sweeney's is a welcome new voice in the burgeoning choir of theologians returning to metaphysics. Carefully critiquing postmodern Heideggerian approaches to sacramental presence, he invites us to recognize the sacraments' transcendent love in the mother's smile. With this evocative use of Hans Urs von Balthasar, Sweeney sets us on the right path: an approach to sacramentality that moves beyond the flat horizons of language and time. Hans Boersma, J.I. Packer Professor of Theology, Regent College, Vancouver
This work will be immensely valuable for those who teach sacramental theology with reference to the Trinitarian Christocentrism embedded in the magisterial teachings of the post-Conciliar era. Sweeney is critical of both the Baroque scholastic temptation (offering the world a metaphysics devoid of the encounter with Christ) and the postmodern temptation (concluding we can't say anything definite about anything.) Instead he suggests we reimagine sacramental presence according to the perspective of the nuptial mystery. Tracey Rowland, Permanent Fellow in Political Philosophy and Continental Theology, John Paul II Institute, Melbourne