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From Faith to Faith:

John Wesley's Covenant Theology and the Way of Salvation

By Stanley J. Rodes

From Faith to Faith

From Faith to Faith:

John Wesley's Covenant Theology and the Way of Salvation

By Stanley J. Rodes

An insightful investigation into how John Wesley reworked the covenant theology of the Reformed tradition into a key element of his understanding of salvation.

Trade Information: JPOD
Available as: Paperback, PDF

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Print Paperback

ISBN: 9780227174289

Specifications: 229x153mm (9x6in), 266pp

Published: September 2014

£25.75

PDF eBook

ISBN: 9780227902202

Specifications: 260pp

Published: September 2014

The idea that covenant theology is profoundly influential in John Wesley's theological thought sounds counter-intuitive. What would an evangelical have to do with a theological framework that historically belongs to a Reformed understanding of salvation? How could this possibly square with his ongoing controversy with the Calvinism of his day?

On the basis of compelling evidence from his sermons and correspondence, this investigation dares to push through the impulse to dismiss the idea that covenant theology belongs to the infrastructure of Wesley's thought. The resulting discovery of its role in shaping his narrative of the way of salvation is surprising and intriguing. Wesley is not only informed and fluent with respect to covenant theology, but thoroughly committed to it.

From Faith to Faith demonstrates that, with theological precision and discernment, Wesley appropriates covenant theology in a way that is consistent both with its primary theological features and with his Arminianism. His distinctive view of "the gradual process of the work of God in the soul" supplies valuable grist for further reflection, especially by those charged with the care of souls in the twenty-first century.

Foreword by T.A. Noble
Preface
Acknowledgments
Abbreviations

Introduction

1. John Wesley's Imaging of Covenant Theology
2. The Ancestry of Wesley's Covenant Theology
3. Wesley's Amendment of Covenant Theology
4. Wesley's Covenant Theology and Holy Scripture
5. Wesley's Covenant Theology in Context:
     I. The Evangelical Revival and the Conversation on Good Works
6. Wesley's Covenant Theology in Context:
     II. The Conversation on Divine Favor
7. The Salvific Sufficiency of the Covenant of Grace
8. The Holy Spirit and the Salvific Perfection of the Covenant of Grace
9. "From Faith to Faith": John Wesley's Pastoral Application of Covenant Theology
10. Epilogue

Bibliography
Name Index
Scripture Index

Stan Rodes serves as Administrative Director for Global Clergy Development for the Church of the Nazarene. He is also a member of the adjunct faculty of Northwest Nazarene University, Idaho.

Rodes has provided an excellent review of who influenced Wesley, how Wesley – with his usual eclectic gleaning – transformed the covenant theology of the Reformed tradition, and why the 'faith of a servant and faith of a child' metaphor is key to understanding Wesley's concept of the way of salvation. Thoroughly researched and intelligently argued, From Faith to Faith is a new and unique contribution to the field of Wesley Studies. A definitely needed addition to the academic's and the pastor's library. Diane Leclerc, Northwest Nazarene University
Filling out the covenantal context of Wesley's practical theology, Rodes is in the proper position to consider, in a way that others have not, Wesley's seasoned reflections on the outworking of the gospel both within the church and well beyond its walls. Kenneth J. Collins, Asbury Theological Seminary
Rodes provides an enlightening account of John Wesley's understanding of salvation by highlighting Wesley's appropriation and adaptation of the covenant (federal) theology of the English Reformed tradition. He critiques from this vantage point the spectrum of views about Wesley's understanding of 'the faith of a servant' in recent scholarship. This is an important study for future consideration of this debated topic. Randy L. Maddox, Duke Divinity School