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Letters of Light:

Passages from Ma'or va-shemesh

By Kalonymus Kalman Epstein of Kraków and Aryeh Wineman (translator)

Letters of Light

Letters of Light:

Passages from Ma'or va-shemesh

By Kalonymus Kalman Epstein of Kraków and Aryeh Wineman (translator)

A translation of and commentary on selected passages from one of the great Hasidic texts, spiritual homilies based on the Mosaic books.

Trade Information: JPOD
Available as: Paperback, PDF

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Print Paperback

ISBN: 9780227175378

Specifications: 229x153mm, 280pp

Published: August 2015

£23.00

PDF eBook

ISBN: 9780227904886

Specifications: 273pp

Published: August 2015

£19.50 + VAT

Letters of Light is a translation of over ninety passages from a well-known Hasidic text, Ma'or va-shemesh, consisting of homilies of Kalonymus Kalman Epstein of Kraków, together with a running commentary and analysis by Aryeh Wineman. With remarkable creativity, the Kraków preacher recast biblical episodes and texts through the prism both of the pietistic values of Hasidism, with its accent on the inner life and the Divine innerness of all existence, and of his ongoing wrestling with questions of the primacy of the individual vis-à-vis that of the community.

The commentary traces the route leading from the Torah-text itself through various later sources to the Kraków preacher's own reading of the biblical text, one that often transforms the very tenor of the text he was expounding. Though composed almost two centuries ago, Ma'or va-shemesh comprises an impressive spiritual statement, many aspects of which can speak to our own time and its spiritual strivings.

List of Abbreviations
Introduction

1. On the First Book of the Torah (B'rei'shit / Genesis)
2. On the Second Book of the Torah (Sh'mot / Exodus)
3. On the Third Book of the Torah (Vayikra / Leviticus)
4. On the Fourth Book of the Torah (B'midbar / Numbers)
5. On the Fifth Book of the Torah (D'varim / Deuteronomy)

Glossary of terms
Bibliography

Kalonymus Kalman ha-Levi Epstein (1753–1823) was the pioneering figure who, against significant opposition, introduced Hasidism to the Jews of Kraków, Poland. The book comprising his homilies, Ma'or va-shemesh, first printed in 1842, became one of the most popular of the Hasidic homily-texts.

The author of several books and numerous articles, Aryeh Wineman has combined his life's work, both in education and in the congregational rabbinate, with his pursuit of scholarly interests in the fields of Hebrew literature and Jewish mysticism. His writings include Beyond Appearances – Stories from the Kabbalistic Ethical Writings, Mystic Tales from the Zohar, and The Hasidic Parable.

Kalonymus Kalman provides a rich, mystical, Hasidic interpretation of the Pentateuch through his innovative and nuanced commentary. Aryeh conveys the full texture of the original Hebrew through his accurate and sparkling translations and deepens our understanding with elucidating insightful comments. Our journey is further enriched by Aryeh's comprehensive scholarly introduction, thorough glossary, and wide-ranging bibliography. Avraham Holtz, Jewish Theological Seminary of America, New York
Aryeh Wineman beautifully translates selections from Ma'or va-shemesh that are masterfully chosen for their spiritual significance to contemporary seekers. His characteristically lucid and concentrated commentary illuminates the text's central messages, displaying an unusual talent for simplifying without reducing. Wineman renders his considerable scholarship impressively accessible to those unfamiliar with reading Hasidic commentary. Nancy Flam, Institute for Jewish Spirituality, Northampton, Massachusetts